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By | Tony Smith 21st January 2005 12:18

Intel 64-bit Pentium 4s make retail debut

Turn up in Tokyo

Intel's 64-bit Pentium 4 processors have gone on sale in Japan, local media report.

The chips, which feature Intel's AMD64-like EM64 technology, aren't new. Launched in August 2004, the chips were geared toward workstation and server roles. Indeed, the boxed units that went on sale this week are clearly labelled "for uni-processor workstations and servers". However, their arrival in Japanese computer-component stores suggests the parts are now being offered outside OEM circles.

All four clock frequencies are available: 3.2, 3.4, 3.6 and 3.8GHz. The latter was only launched last month. Intel's official price list has the four chips down at $278, $278, $417 and $637, respectively, when sold in batches of 1000 CPUs.

In Tokyo stores, they're priced at ¥30,980 ($300), ¥32,175 ($312), ¥47,157 ($457) and ¥78,084 ($756) on average, respectively.

All four chips use the LGA775 socket infrastructure. The chips all sport an 'F' after their clock speed to indicate the presence of EM64T. ®

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